Around the Art House: Pride 2019

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In cities throughout the United States June is Pride, a month to celebrate LGTBQ experience, identity, self-determination, and community. The celebration also commemorates the 1969 Stonewall Uprising, protests against police harassment and violence that were foundational in the Gay Liberation movement. It is also occasion to celebrate LGTBQ filmmakers and filmgoers absolutely paramount contributions to the history of art cinema, from midnight movies, to audiences participation, to the resuscitation of old Hollywood legends as cult figures, much of the vibrancy of the art house community were conceived and nurtured by communities of queer film lovers. This June check out some of the art houses paying tribute to important queer filmmakers and cinema. 

Barbara Hammer: The Body in Film, The Wexner Center for the Arts
Columbus, Ohio


In addition to presenting the exhibition Barbara Hammer: In This Body, the Wexner Center for the Arts is hosting three programs of work by legendary experimental filmmaker Barbara Hammer. The subject of retrospectives at MoMA and the Tate, and a Teddy Award Winner, Hammer was known for her innovative formal style, lyricism, and pioneering depictions of lesbian intimacy and identity, as well as her political conviction and activism. The programs Mortal Bodies, Sensual Bodies, and Political Bodies explore Hammer’s depictions of physical vulnerability, pleasure, and her efforts to “find the political,” and include her films Nitrate Kisses (1992), A Horse is Not a Metaphor (2009), and Multiple Orgasm (1977). A longtime friend of the Wexner, Hammer passed away earlier this year, during her illness she became a committed advocate for terminally ill people’s right to die.

Paris is Burning, Film Forum, New York, NY


Before Ryan Murphy’s Pose or KIKI there was Paris is Burning. Activist filmmaker Jennie Livingston filmed Paris, a depiction of the city’s underground ballroom scene, in New York in the late 1980s. Pioneered by LGTBQ Black and Latinx activists and artists, Ballroom created a community in which houses, functioning as families, competed in dance, drag, performance, and fashion categories. Ballroom offered, and continues to offer, a platform to innovate performance art, social critique, and a supportive network in the face of homophobia, poverty, and government failure. Livingston’s films captures key figures from the community including house mother Pepper LeBeija, drag queen Dorian Corey, and choreographer Willie Ninja, describing their approach to dance and performance, and highlighting the political potency of assuming the roles of executives and military officials for ball categories. The film continues to provoke important conversations about vouyerism, white filmmakers’ relationships to their subjects, and who profits from documentary, while remaining a moving encounter with inspiring activists and artists. This June the film returns to New York for screenings at Film Forum.

“Since Stonewall,” Trylon Cinema, Minneapolis, MN

The Trylon Cinema in Minneapolis celebrates the anniversary of Stonewall with “Since Stonewall,” a two-screening series featuring presentation of  The Boys in the Band (soon to be adapted again by Ryan Murphy), a 1970 film adaptation of the popular off-Broadway play considered one of mainstream film’s first depictions of gay life, and The Celluloid Closet, a seminal documentary about LGTBQ representation in Hollywood Cinema.

Ek Ladki Ko Dekha Toh Aisa Laga, TIFF Bell Lightbox, Toronto, Ontario


TIFF Bell Lightbox presents a screening of Ek Ladki Ko Dekha Toh Aisa Laga, Bollywood’s first lesbian love story and a conversation about representation and inclusivity in Bollywood. Co-written by transgender activist and screenwriter Gazal Dhaliwal, the film is the first to depict Lesbian relationships within the context of a mainstream Indian film (filmmakers including Deepa Metha have previously explored lesbian relationships in indie cinema). Panelists include film programmer Aaditya Aggarwal, and Indu Vashist, Executive Director of the South Asian Visual Arts Center.

Visiting Members Program: The Loft Cinema to The Frida Cinema

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The Art House Convergence Visiting Members Program provides reciprocal membership benefits to members from all of its participating theaters. Are you a devoted art house member ready for adventure? Art House Convergence is providing travel tips and resources for film aficionados ready to visit some of the United States’ best art houses.

We are kicking off our Visiting Members blog series with a Southwestern road trip from the Loft Cinema in Tucson, AZ to the Frida Cinema in Santa, CA.

The Loft Cinema, Tucson, AZ

Tucson’s independent movie theater since 1972. The Loft Cinema is a nonprofit dedicated to creating community by celebrating the art and diversity of film. They screen first-run independent and foreign films and host tons of special series including the campy Mondo Mondays (weird, wild, and wonderful), a running program of Essential Cinema (classics the way they were meant to be seen), family programs, cult classics, and plenty of outdoor screenings (past screenings have included a presentation of JAWS poolside).   They were the first U.S.-based member of the Solar World Cinema movement, and use solar energy to power their main building.

Frida Cinema Santa Ana, CA

Located in downtown Santa Ana the Frida is the only non-profit art house in Orange County. They opened in 2014 and have since become an absolutely essential destination for film lovers. They are a cult movie and horror haven with huge audiences turning out for new releases like MANDY and TRAIN TO BUSAN, a Horror Movie Night hosted in collaboration with HorrorBuzz, the Camp Frida 12 hour horror marathon, and the Starship Frida intergalactic movie marathon.  They also get the whole team involved with the monthly “Volunteer of the Month Pick.”

On the Road…

En route from Tucson, AZ to Santa Ana, CA stop for ice cream, cocktails, and a hike through the desert.

Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art Scottsdale, AZ

Heading north on I-10 from Tucson you will pass through Phoenix and Scottsdale, AZ, stop into the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art  to see some rare gems including Knight Rise, one of light and space artist James Turrell’s completed Skyspaces, and rotating exhibitions of works by important contemporary artists.

Sugar Bowl Ice Cream Parlor Scottsdale, AZ

Take a break from clean modern lines in the the candy-colored Sugar Bowl Ice Cream Parlor an old-timey parlor decked out in bubble-gum pink. The Sugar Bowl has been serving up sweet treats since 1958 and their menu includes soda fountain classics alongside some truly tasty sundaes.

Joshua Tree, CA

After entering California along I-10 you will pass along the southern border of Joshua Tree National Park, an exquisite national park named for its scrubby Joshua Trees. See beautiful rock formations and desert vistas. Approaching from the freeway stop at the Cottonwood Visitor Center and choose a hike in the southern portion of the park.

Palm Springs, CA

After time outside head to the vacation destination of Palm Springs, CA to luxuriate in the midcentury modern oasis that has been a getaway for classic Hollywood stars including Elizabeth Taylor, Elvis Presley, and Katherine Hepburn. Pick up a map for a self-guided architectural tour at the Aerial Tramway Station (designed by E. Stewart Williams) or enjoy one of the many guided midcentury modern tours offered around town. Enjoy a cocktail at Mini Bar at the opulent Parker Hotel, or a classic deli sandwich and mile-high slice of cake at Sherman’s (for those interested in a more contemporary take on the deli head to Wexler’s @ ARRIVE). Ready for another ice cream? Head to Lappert’s.

Cabazon Dinosaurs Cabazon, CA

Famous for their role in PEE WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE, the Cabazon Dinosaurs are a classic Jurassic roadside attraction for tourists visiting Palm Springs.

Mission Inn Hotel & Spa Riverside, CA

Located between Palm Springs and Orange Country, as you transition from I-10 to CA-91 Riverside is the hometown of California citrus and was once a vacation destination for wealthy east-coasters seeking rest and relaxation in the sunshine. Designed to intertwine fantasies of the west with European grandeur, the Mission Inn is an extravagant example of Californian-Mission Revival Architecture. Walk the expansive grounds and drop into the Presidential Lounge for a J.F.K Cosmopolitan or W.H. Taft Appletini (likely not the cocktail Taft ordered during his 1909 visit.)

Finished seeing Riverside? Hop on CA-91 and continue on to the Frida!

The Invisible Cinema at Anthology Film Archives.

Around the Art House: Experimental Film

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Did you know that Ann Arbor is home to longest-running experimental film festival in North America?
Since 1963 the Ann Arbor Film Festival has been hosting screenings with artists ranging from Yoko Ono and the Velvet Underground to more recent presentations of work by Akosua Adoma Owusu. This summer Art House Convergence is celebrating this history with an educational session dedicated to curating experimental films at our Regional Seminar.

So what is experimental film?
Like the designation “art film,” experimental film, and the oft-used associated designations of avant-garde and underground are regularly debated and contested, and have been parsed out in a variety of texts. Produced without traditional commercial imperatives and regularly rejecting standard narrative causality, experimental films are often micro-budget, small gauge, abstract, and irreverent. They might reference Hollywood, recycling its refuse into punk, queer, and subversive critique, but they definitely aren’t of Hollywood, and though money changes hands they definitely operate using a financial system distinct from the mainstream.

Read more in Allegories of Cinema (David James, 1989), An Introduction to American Underground Film (Sheldon Renan, 1967), Politics of Resistance: Women, Power, and Politics in the New York Avant-Garde Cinema 1941 – 1971 (Lauren Rabinowitz, 2003), Visionary Film: The American Avant-Garde 1945 – 1980 (P. Adams Sitney, 1974).

Ready to watch some films?
Check out our list of some of the United States’ longest-running exhibitors of experimental film, then stop in for a screening.

Why were all of these organizations founded in the 1970s?
Like art houses during the mid-2000s, during the late 1960s experimental film exhibitors were contending with significant market disruption. Throughout the 1960s, while the Production Code exerted its last waning influence on commercial Hollywood cinema and the Supreme Court tentatively thawed government regulation of obscenity, exhibitors of experimental film often operated as (precariously) commercial enterprises — attracting viewers with the promise of transgressive, and titillating content, as well as politically radical art. However, in the 1970s in the face of the New Hollywood Cinema and the commercialization of pornography, the dominant model shifted. Exhibitors embraced and expressed their steadfast commitment to film as art and arts education, establishing themselves as media arts nonprofits, and seeking support from the (relatively) new NEA and other government initiatives like CETA.

Grounded in a commitment to cultural enrichment, and democratic arts access, these exhibitors forged a lasting model that thrives today. Pay them a visit for some truly eye-opening experiences.

Anthology Film Archives, New York, NY, since 1970


Founded by filmmakers Stan Brakhage, Peter Kubelka, and Jonas Mekas, a figure known for his role in founding a variety of influential institutions of the New York avant-garde including the Filmmaker’s Cooperative and
Film Culture magazine, along with patron Jerome Hill, and scholar P. Adams Sitney, whose widely-read Visionary Film is celebrated and critiqued for forging the most widely-read history of of avant-garde cinema. The organization launched with a manifesto and promised to exhibit “film as art,” asking “What are the essentials of the film experience? Which films embody the heights of the art of cinema?”

Confident in their capacities as arbiters of quality, Anthology’s founding curatorial board created a list of essential films they promised to screen many times, believing that the very best films warranted multiple viewings. Their list included some of the most frequently watched avant-garde films to date including Maya Deren’s Meshes of the Afternoon and Marcel Duchamp’s Anemic Cinema, as well as narrative features likes Charlie Chaplin’s Gold Rush, and underground works including Robert Nelson’s parody Bleu Shut, which features a timer in the corner as a nod to anxiety about avant-garde film’s protracted run-times.

Essential films were to play in the “invisible cinema.” Described as “a machine for film viewing,” the invisible cinema was the antithesis of contemporary multiplex loungers and cinema-beds. In an era before rampant in-theater texting, filmmaker Peter Kubelka designed the cinema so that guests would sit on firm, hard-backed chairs flanked by partitions so that they would look at the screen and not each other.

Today Anthology is home to a tremendous archive including the world’s largest paper collection related to independent and experimental cinema and screens more than 900 programs annually, featuring films a global array of innovative retrospectives. 2019 programs included “Punk Lust: Raw Provocations,” “Prison Images: Incarceration and the Cinema,” and a tribute to founder Jonas Mekas, who passed away in 2018.

Los Angeles Filmforum, Los Angeles, CA, Since 1975

Founded by Terry Cannon in the Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena (home to the annual Rose Bowl) at a time when the former-turn of the century retreat for millionaires attracted artists with low rents and commercial vacancies. Pasadena Filmforum was a decidedly funky west-coast outpost for alternative film viewing where guests often sat on couches for relaxed, salon-style conversations.

Cannon was a recent graduate from San Francisco State University and had encountered experimental film programming in the Bay Area. Still in his early 20s, he received a seed money grant from the aptly-titled Pasadena Community Spirit Organization and set to work hosting visiting filmmakers and celebrating work by locally-based, unknown outsider artists like Sara Kathryn Arledge, whose 1958 film What is a Man, remains a sharp, hilarious critique of masculinity. Early series included “Women in Film,” “In Person: Shirley Clarke,” and “West Coast Funk.” In 1982 the organization launched “Show for the Eyes,” the first international mail art project.

Today Los Angeles Filmforum has been host to a variety of significant retrospectives and research projects on the history of experimental film including Scratching the Belly of the Beast: Cutting-Edge Media in Los Angeles, 1922 94,  Alternative Projections: Experimental Film in Los Angeles 1945 – 1980, and Ism, Ism Ism: Experimental Cinema in Latin America. The organization operates as a mobile cinema, working with the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood and MOCA to host programs including “Representations of Leaving: Queer Death and heavens,” “Small, real: Observation and the Mundane,” and programs of films by Kevin Jerome Everson and Martha Colburn. 

Facets, Chicago, IL, since 1975

The marquee of Facets Cinematheque.

The marquee of Facets Cinematheque.


They were committed to the work, withstanding Chicago-winters with little heat, renovation, and micro-budget to forge an innovative program featuring an international array of films (a scope reflective of Stehlik’s own background as a Czech cinephile). The couple’s commitment to the art of film was clear and celebrated locals including film critic Roger Ebert, and national figures like Brian O’Doherty of the National Endowment of the Arts once said “
It is Milos and the few people in this country like him who are continuing to nourish the art film.”

In the 1980s, as the marketplace evolved, Facets adapted, forging a name for itself as a leading distributor and force in the home video market and  bringing works by filmmakers including James Broughton and Barbara Hammer to a broader audience.

Today Facets streams films from its website, operates a cinematheque year-round, boasts an enormous DVD library, is home to a youth education program, and presents the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival. Recent screenings include Black Mother and you can still catch the films of James Broughton, as well as an array of international avant-garde films on FacetsEdge

San Francisco Cinematheque, San Francisco, CA, since 1961

Cinemanews, the newsletter of Canyon Cinema.

Cinemanews, the newsletter of Canyon Cinema.


An offshoot of Canyon Cinema, a cooperative launched by filmmakers including Bruce Baillie and Chick Strand, as well Ernest Callenbach of Film Quarterly. Guided by an anarchic, alternative ethos,  the organization began as backyard screenings. A 1963 newsletter observed “Our theater began in the backyard of a beautiful lady in Canyon, California, summer, 1961. If there are new films there must be theaters, this was the reason for beginning.” By 1962 screenings were nomadic, occurring in homes, backyards, and even an anarchist restaurant.

Notable about the programming, was that Strand and Baillie acknowledged that some films would be bad. They wanted to explore new approaches to filmmaking, and recognized that required taking risks as artists and exhibitors. Recollections of their program at this time frame it as witchy and wonderful, fliers featured hand drawn flourishes, Chick would attend to the box office in a cloak with candles. It felt like a community and was genuinely funky, forging an ethos that have been credited as inspiring contemporary micro-cinemas.  In 1966 the filmmakers formed a distribution cooperative for “willing devotees of the magic lantern muse,” and invited all film artists to participate.

In 1976, with hopes of achieving non-profit status the Canyon Cinema’s distribution and exhibition arms separated. The distributor continued to operate cooperatively, while the distributor that would become the San Francisco Cinematheque became a non-profit and received funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Canyon Cinema, which became a non-profit in 2012, remains one of the most important distributors of experimental cinema in the United States. Once an outsider, by the 1980s the Cinematheque was considered by locals to have become establishment and was subject to a revolution in the form of a “takeover” screening. The revolutionaries would go on to form No Nothing Cinema while the Cinematheque would form a programming committee with hopes of becoming more egalitarian.

Today the San Francisco Cinematheque operates as a mobile exhibitor, hosts the annual film festival Crossroads, featuring a combination of film and performance at SFMOMA, and presents a year-round screenings series featuring programs like “Imaging the Avant-Garde: Taiwan’s Experimental Films of the 1960s” and “The Shape of Surface.” In 2010, Steve Anker, who was director of the Cinematheque from 1992 until 2003 partnered with Steve Seid and Kathy Geritz of the Pacific Film Archive to co-edit Radical Light: Alternative Film & Video in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1945 – 2000.

Walker Cinema, Minneapolis, MN, since 1973

In 1973 the Walker Art Center consolidated its experimental film exhibition by establishing a dedicated film department under stewardship of film coordinator John Hanhardt, who had been recruited from the Museum of Modern Art, and began a film study collection with plans to develop an archive. As an interdisciplinary arts center, the Walker integrated media into its galleries, built a collection, and hosted theatrical screenings. During the 1970s, curator Melinda Ward collaborated with Sally Dixon who was running the media arts center Film in the Cities (FITC) to bring filmmakers including Stan Brakhage and Robert Breer to the Twin Cities. Pioneering filmmaker Hollis Frampton, whose (nostalgia) and Zorns Lemma experimented with time and language, was among the program’s participants, recalling that on earlier trip to the Twin Cities he had narrowly evaded a plane crash by lingering at an Edward Weston exhibition of photographs.

Today the Walker Ruben/ Bentson Moving Image Collection features more than 1,000 titles, including works by Joan Jonas, Gunvor Nelson, and Derek Jarman, and selection plays regularly in an audience-programmed mini cinematheque on the museum’s ground floor. The Walker also commissions new moving image works and hosts curated screenings, recent programs include INDIgenesis: Indigenous Filmmakers Past and Present, combining narrative and experimental work, curated by Missy Whiteman and Film in the Cities: A History and Legacy.

Around the Art House: Going Green

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Happy Earth Week! All around the world art houses are instituting sustainable and eco-conscious policies and programs to make their theaters wonderful places for the audience of today and the audience of tomorrow. Ready to take the next steps towards reducing carbon emissions or plastic use? Prepared to participate in global initiatives to respond to environmental crisis? We all have a role to play in reducing waste and sharing knowledge.

We’ve put together a list of some theaters that are doing amazing work in their communities.

Amherst Cinema, Amherst MA

In order to be more green Amherst Cinema is reducing waste and embracing renewable energy. They have started using compostable cups, straws, and lids, are phasing out landfill packaging, and have successfully cut their landfill trash by approximately 75%. In order to acclimate audiences to the transition they have also produced a PSA that screens before all films and includes trash sorting instructions.

They currently get 100% of their power from renewable sources, 1/3 from their own rooftop solar array, and 2/3 from wind energy, and are replacing fluorescent light bulbs with more energy efficient LED bulbs. They were able to subsidize the installation through fundraising and a local cultural facilities grant.

Ready to start composting? Check out the U.S. Composting Council’s Guide to Workplace Composting.

Belcourt Theatre, Nashville TN

MVIMG_20190422_152840_50Market research estimates that Americans are using over 100 billion straws per year and they are contributing to the eight million tons of plastic that flow to our beaches. Many states, businesses, and organizations including the Belcourt Theatre in Nasvhille, TN are attempting to curb this trend by changing practices so that their straws stop going into landfills and onto beaches. The Belcourt currently has a straw recycling program and has switched to compostable popcorn bags, and by installing new, clearly labeled waste receptacles they are making sure that patrons understand how to help reduce waste and that disposables end up where they belong.

Ready to reduce plastic straw waste? Check out One Last Straw’s list of alternatives.

Echo Park Film Center, Los Angeles CA

cover-epfc_photoAs a micro-cinema and media arts center committed to equal and affordable access to film/video resources, The Echo Park Film Center in Los Angeles has integrated eco-friendly priorities into its infrastructure and its curriculum. The organization hosts offsite film programming throughout the Los Angeles area using an eco-friendly Filmmobile, fueled by a combination of solar power and waste vegetable oil.

The cooperatively managed film center also hosts a robust, environmentally conscious educational program, offering classes including “Eco-Processing for Super 8 Film,” in which students learn to process film with beer, wine, coffee and other non-toxic materials, and “How Does Your Garden Grow?” in which students worked with activists, gardeners, and artists to produce films about urban gardening.

Ready to see some of the amazing eco-friendly artwork students are producing? Check out the EPFC Vimeo channel.

The Loft Cinema, Tucson AZ 

IMG_7306Located in sunny Tucson, AZ The Loft Cinema, has embraced solar energy as a way to reduce their carbon footprint. They use solar energy to power their main building (housing screens 1 and 2), marquee, and all of their outdoor screenings.

Their outdoor screenings are powered by their solar-powered mobile cinema. The Loft Cinema was the first U.S.-based member of the Solar World Cinema movement, a global network of solar powered mobile cinemas with participants based in countries including Brazil, Gambia, and Nepal. The van utilizes a 1.24 kW solar electricity installation, comprised of 4 LG 315 W modules, paired with an off-grid inverter and battery array, installed by Technicians For Sustainability, allowing the van to store energy generated during day-time hours for evening operations, screen inflation, and up to three hours of film and audio projection.

The Loft’s solar-powered mobile cinema travels to neighborhoods throughout the Southwest and beyond, as well as festivals and other outdoor events in Tucson, enabling a simple solution for on-the-fly screenings for large audiences.

Considering going solar? Check out the Technicians For Sustainability Solar Education Portal.

Palm Theatre, San Luis Obispo, CA

DSC0196Located in beautiful San Luis Obispo north of Santa Barbara, CA, The Palm Theatre was the first solar-powered cinema in the United States. In 2004 owner Jim Dee committed to reducing the theater’s carbon footprint and installed 80 solar photovoltaic sun-facing panels, eliminating 22,152 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions per year.

Since then, 18 additional panels have been added, each eliminating 25% more pounds of carbon dioxide than the original 80. The transition hasn’t just helped the theater more effectively pursue its mission, its also helped reduce overhead, electricity costs, and dependence on utilities companies. As Dee notes “businesses that plan to operate for more than 10 years should invest in green energy. Movie theaters are perfect for solar power because operation hours usually spike at night, after all of the solar power is collected.”

Does your theater have a green initiative you would like to share? Email us at info@arthouseconvergence.org!

Nikki_Trylon_1

Around the Art House: 35mm at the Trylon Cinema

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Screening films six nights a week, the formerly micro Trylon Cinema in the Longfellow neighborhood of Minneapolis, MN opened in 2009 and expanded in 2017 to its current 90 seat capacity. They host classic and repertory series regularly with themes including Reaganland: 1980s Dystopia, Robert Bresson: Transcendence and Austerity and Majesty in Monochrome: Black and White Cinemascope. The Trylon also regularly goes on location to host screenings at the city’s historic Heights and Riverview theaters including the Minneapolis Hitchcock Festival. The 1926 Beaux Arts Heights Theater can project 35mm and 70mm and the Trylon regularly presents 35mm, believing that “35mm film has a warmth and feel that should be part of the moviegoing experience, just like the real butter on our popcorn.” Most nights you can find Cinema Manager and expert film handler Nikki Weispfenning behind the projector threading, winding, and ensuring the excellent presentation of prints ranging from archival gems to faded cult classics. Here, Managing Director Alison Kozberg asks Nikki questions about life in the booth.

Nikki, you are a 35mm projectionist. How did you learn to handle film?
I learned to project when I was living in New York. I worked box office and concessions at the Sunshine Cinema (which closed in 2018) — after a couple years they promoted me to shift manager, which involved projecting. At the time, every theater had at least one union projectionist. The Sunshine’s was Joe Lynch and he taught me how to thread projectors. I followed him around for a few shifts and I ran one film – this was in 2003. But then I moved to DC for a year and didn’t work in a theater again until I moved back to Minneapolis in 2007. A couple people I knew were helping to reopen the Parkway Theater, so I started there as a part-time projectionist. And once I was at the Parkway, I learned everything I didn’t know very quickly on the job. I started working at the Trylon in 2011.

Tell me a bit about the Trylon.
The Trylon Cinema is a 501c3 nonprofit. We only have three employees including me and John Moret our programmer, as well as amazing volunteers including our Executive Director. It is a one screen theater and one of my favorite places in the world. Our programming is almost entirely repertory, with the exception of Sound Unseen (usually music documentaries). We have presented films by the Shaw Brothers on 35mm, as well as series on Kobayashi, Cocteau, Ava Gardner, and Warren Oates.

Let’s talk about prints.
In the 35mm vs. digital debate, I almost always land in favor of film. Prints can be really memorable, just because of weird little things going on with them. Film can be more challenging and is definitely more work, but it is more fun! When something goes wrong with film I am much more likely to be able to fix the problem in a timely manner. When the film breaks, you fix it and are going again in 90 seconds! When a server loses power, you are down for at least 10 minutes and it is nerve-wracking.

I like pristine prints and I like grittier ones — they both have their place. We showed a print of Bergman’s Shame that was one of the best prints I have ever seen — just amazing. It was my first time watching that movie, and the print was so gorgeous that it definitely made me appreciate that movie more than if I had seen it under less ideal circumstances. But on the other hand, the print of Wild At Heart we showed last month is the same one we showed a couple years ago and it is a bit beat up  — which seems perfect for that movie… I love that movie, but it has a trashy vibe that is enhanced by a few scratches.

What kind of projectors does the Trylon have?
For 35mm we have two Century model SAs. We only run 2000 ft reels (some booths run from platters or from 6000 ft reels). Every 15-20 minutes a projectionist is threading, watching for cue marks, and making the changeover between the two projectors.

What is your favorite film that you have projected?
My favorite film to project is Hausu. We show it every year at the Trylon, last year we only had four screenings, but some years we’ve had as many as nine. I’ve only seen it twice, but I’ve projected it more than any other film.

The Trylon used to have a series in which programmers defended films that are generally hated, is there a film that you would like to defend?
My defenders pick would either be Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights or Gleaming the Cube.

You introduced me to a game in which one selects their favorite film for every year of their life. What are your favorite films from 1984, 1996, and 2002?
1984: Streets of Fire
1996: Irma Vep
2002: Esther Kahn

The Films of Agnès Varda

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la-agnes-varda-20131108-006 (1)March 29, 2019 marked the passing of Agnès Varda (1928 – 2019), an influential, curious, and exceptional filmmaker whose career as an artist and filmmaker spanned over sixty years. She has often been called the “grandmother of the French New Wave,” and worked alongside fellow left bank filmmakers Chris Marker and Alain Resnais. Her films include the feminist portrait Cléo from 5 to 7, the bohemian Lions Love (…and Lies), tender portraits of her husband Jacques Demy, and thoughtful, essayistic examinations of her own life including Beaches of Agnés. As the art house community pays tribute to a filmmaker who touched our hearts, enlivened our cinemas, and helped us see the world with greater empathy and interest, we have prepared a guide of where to find some of her films so that you can share them with audiences and loved ones.

La Pointe Courte (1954)  “The great Agnés Varda’s film career began with this graceful, penetrating study of a marriage on the rocks, set against the backdrop of a small Mediterranean fishing village. Both a stylized depiction of the complicated relationship between a married couple (played by Silvia Monfort and Philippe Noiret) and a documentary-like look at the daily struggles of the locals, Varda’s discursive, gorgeously filmed debut was radical enough to later be considered one of the progenitors of the coming French New Wave.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962) “Agnés Varda eloquently captures Paris in the sixties with this real-time portrait of a singer (Corinne Marchand) set adrift in the city as she awaits test results of a biopsy. A chronicle of the minutes of one woman’s life, Cléo from 5 to 7 is a spirited mix of vivid vérité and melodrama, featuring a score by Michel Legrand (The Umbrellas of Cherbourg) and cameos by Jean-Luc Godard and Anna Karina.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Le bonheur (1965) “Though married to the good-natured, beautiful Thérèse (Claire Drouot), young husband and father François (Jean-Claude Drouot) finds himself falling unquestioningly into an affair with an attractive postal worker. One of Agnés Varda’s most provocative films, Le bonheur examines, with a deceptively cheery palette and the spirited strains of Mozart, the ideas of fidelity and happiness in a modern, self-centered world.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Uncle Yanco (1967) “In her effervescent first California film, Agnès Varda delves into her own family history. The short documentary Uncle Yanco features Varda tracking down a Greek emigrant relative she’s never met, discovering an artist and kindred soul leading a bohemian life in Sausalito.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Lions Love (…and Lies) (1969) “Agnès Varda brings New York counterculture to Los Angeles. In a rented house in the sun-soaked Hollywood Hills, a woman and two men—Viva, of Warhol Factory fame, and James Rado and Gerome Ragni, who created and starred in the rock musical Hair—delight in one another’s bodies while musing on love, stardom, and politics. They are soon joined by underground director Shirley Clarke, playing herself as well as functioning as a surrogate for Varda. Lions Love (. . . and Lies) is a metacinematic inquiry into the alternating currents of whimsy and tragedy that typified late-sixties America.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Black Panthers (1968) “Agnès Varda turns her camera on an Oakland demonstration against the imprisonment of activist and Black Panthers cofounder Huey P. Newton. In addition to evincing Varda’s fascination with her adopted surroundings and her empathy, this perceptive short is also a powerful political statement.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Daguerréotypes (1975) “A compassionate portrait of Parisian shopkeepers.” Contact: Cinema Guild, tom(AT)cinemaguild.com

One Sings, the Other Doesn’t
(1977) “
Agnès Varda’s unsung feminist anthem is both a buoyant chronicle of a transformative friendship and an empowering vision of universal sisterhood. When seventeen-year-old Pauline (Valérie Mairesse) helps struggling mother of two Suzanne (Thérèse Liotard) procure the money for an abortion, a deep bond forms between the two, one that endures over the course of more than a decade as each searches for her place in the world—encountering the dawning of the women’s movement, dreamy boho musical numbers, and an Iranian adventure along the way. Initially divisive for its sunny, idealized view of female liberation, One Sings, the Other Doesn’t now seems all the more radical—and all the more vital—for its unabashedly utopian spirit.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Mur Murs (1981) “After returning to Los Angeles from France in 1979, Agnès Varda created this kaleidoscopic documentary about the striking murals that decorate the city. Bursting with color and vitality, Mur Murs is as much an invigorating study of community and diversity as it is an essential catalog of unusual public art.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Documenteur (1981) “This small-scale fiction about a divorced mother and her child (played by Agnès Varda’s own son) leading a quiet existence on L.A.’s margins was made directly after Mur Murs, and though Documenteur is different in form and tone from that film, the two are complexly interwoven, with overlapping images and ideas. This meditative portrait of urban isolation overflows with subtle visual poetry.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Vagabond (1985) “Sandrine Bonnaire won the Best Actress César for her portrayal of the defiant young drifter Mona, found frozen to death in a ditch at the beginning of Vagabond. Agnès Varda pieces together Mona’s story through flashbacks told by those who encountered her (played by a largely nonprofessional cast), producing a splintered portrait of an enigmatic woman. With its sparse, poetic imagery, Vagabond (Sans toit ni loi) is a stunner, and won Varda the top prize at the Venice Film Festival.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Jane B. for Agnès V (1987) “I’ll look at you, but not at the camera. It could be a trap,” whispers Jane Birkin shyly into Agnès Varda’s ear at the start of Jane B. Par Agnès V. The director of Cleo From 5 to 7 and Vagabond once again paints a portrait of a woman, this time in a marvelously Expressionistic way. “It’s like an imaginary bio-pic,” says Varda. Jane, of course, is the famed singer (“Je t’aime … Moi non plus”), actress (Blow Up), fashion icon (the Hermes Birkin bag) and longtime muse to Serge Gainsbourg. As Varda implies, Jane B. Par Agnès V.abandons the traditional bio-pic format, favoring instead a freewheeling mix of gorgeous and unexpected fantasy sequences.

In each, Jane inhabits a new character, playing a cat & mouse game with Varda as they explore the role of the Muse and the Artist, all the while showcasing the multifaceted nature of Birkin’s talent. “I’d like to be filmed as if I were transparent, anonymous, like everyone else,” says Birkin. But her wish to be a “famous nobody” is impossible to achieve; Birkin is simply too magnificent, too mesmerizing. Here, Varda’s signature mix of aesthetic innovation and generosity of emotion results in a surreal and captivating essay on Art, Fame, Love, Children and Staircases. For its first-ever U.S. theatrical release the film has been newly-restored from the original 35mm camera negative, overseen by director Varda herself. (In French with English subtitles.)” Contact: Arbelos Films, info(at)arbelosfilms.com

Kung Fu Master(1987) “A lovely, bittersweet companion to Jane B. Par Agnès V. from director Agnes Varda and star/muse Jane Birkin, Kung-Fu Master! has nothing to do with martial arts – the film’s title comes from an arcade video game played obsessively in the film by a teenaged boy, Julien. Birkin delivers one of her finest performances as a lonely 40-year old woman who finds herself shattering taboos by falling in love with the 14-year old Julien – but is it romance, or a desperate attempt to turn back time in the face of middle age? Kung-Fu Master! is truly a family affair: Varda’s son with the late director Jacques Demy, Mathieu Demy, plays Julien – and Birkin appears here with her two real-life daughters: Charlotte Gainsbourg (from Lars von Trier’s Melancholia) and Lou Doillon, her child with well-known filmmaker Jacques Doillon. Briefly released in the late 1980s in the U.S. and long unavailable here, Kung-Fu Master! has been beautifully restored from the original 35mm camera negative. “It’s a film in which all the younger actors are the children of the director and lead actress” says Varda. “It was like a picnic, you know?” (In French with English subtitles.)” Contact: Arbelos Films, info(at)arbelosfilms.com

The Gleaners and I (2000) “Along the French roads she travels, Agnès meets with many gleaners. These people, men or women, are gatherers, recyclers, genuine treasure hunters. Out of necessity, chance or choice, the gleaners deal with what others have discarded. Their world is an astonishing one that has nothing to do with that of the ancient gleaners: these peasant women who gathered the wheat left behind after the harvest. Agnès is a gleaner too and her documentary film is a subjective one. There is no age for curiosity. Making films is also a sort of gleaning.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Cinévardaphoto (2004)  “A triptych of short films exploring the power and vitality of the photograph. In Ydessa, The Bears and Etc., Varda discovers a haunting exhibit of found photos, each showing a teddy bear. With Ulysses, she deconstructs a picture from her early career as a photographer. While the exuberant Salut les Cubains uses still photos to capture the spirit of the Cuban revolution’s early days.” Contact: Cinema Guild, tom(AT)cinemaguild.com

The Beaches of Agnès (2008) “A reflection on art, life and the movies, The Beaches of Agnès is a magnificent film from the great Agnès Varda, director of The Gleaners and I and Cleo from 5 to 7, a richly cinematic self portrait that touches on everything from the feminist movement and the Black Panthers to the films of husband Jacques Demy (The Umbrellas of Cherbourg) and the birth of the French New Wave.” Contact: Janus Films, booking(at)janusfilms.com

Agnés Varda: From Here to There (2011) “A five part documentary series that chronicles the indefatigable filmmaker’s travels around the world, meeting friends, artists and filmmakers for an expansive view of the global contemporary art scene. Whether in Los Angeles or St. Petersburg, Lisbon or Mexico, Varda finds herself talking with Alexander Sokurov, sharing a meal with sculptor Christian Boltanski and his partner artist Annette Messager, visiting with Chris Marker at his home, or dancing with Manoel de Oliveira. Each encounter is infused with the director’s characteristic insight, inquisitiveness and wonder….A joyous celebration of life, art and people.” Contact: Cinema Guild, tom(AT)cinemaguild.com

Faces Places (2017) “89-year old Agnes Varda, one of the leading figures of the French New Wave, and acclaimed 33 year-old French photographer and muralist JR teamed up to co-direct this enchanting documentary/road movie. Kindred spirits, Varda and JR share a lifelong passion for images and how they are created, displayed and shared. Together they travel around the villages of France in JR’s photo truck meeting locals, learning their stories and producing epic-size portraits of them. The photos are prominently displayed on houses, barns, storefronts and trains revealing the humanity in their subjects, and themselves. Faces Places documents these heartwarming encounters as well as the unlikely, tender friendship they formed along the way.” Contact: Cohen Media Group

MUBI is presenting The Beaches of Agnés, Jacquot de Nantes and Salut Les Cubains as part of the loving homage Adieu Agnés Varda “A small tribute to a grand figure who has just left us at the age of 90: Agnès Varda. Godmother of the French New Wave, prolific auteur, nimble innovator, and constant inspiration as an artist and a person, Varda was one of the most important artists of the cinema. During her expansive, illustrious career, she made an endlessly eclectic array of feminist cinema, ranging from playful documentaries to subversive fictions.”

** This is a particularly sad farewell for many members of the community, please be patient as distributors respond to your requests.
** We are still seeking information about theatrical rights for Jacquot de Nantes, The Young Girls Turn 25, A Hundred and One Nights, and The World of Jacques Demy, if you handle U.S. distribution for these films please contact us.

A Letter to Variety

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To the Editor: Re “Inside Indie Movie Theaters’ Battle to Survive” (Variety Feature)

Brent Lang and Matt Donnelly are right, thousands of screens in the United States are operated by independents. However, the depiction of these theaters as imperiled is incomplete and inaccurate.

Throughout the United States, independent cinemas that prioritize community engagement and ambitious programming are thriving. At Art House Convergence, a national association committed to advancing excellence in film exhibition, participation in our annual conference has increased from 27 in 2008 to over 700 in 2019, a reflection of the number of art house cinemas opening, expanding, and embracing the vitality of theatrical exhibition.

Joined by the guiding principle of “community-based, mission-driven,” these theaters, which number in the hundreds, aren’t merely trying to “out hustle the bigger circuits.” They are effectively strategizing financial growth and sustainability to support exemplary theatrical experiences, media education programs, and meaningful conversations — and their communities are growing. Since 2009, for instance, the Gateway Film Center (Columbus, OH) has doubled its attendance, while the Belcourt Theatre (Nashville, TN) has increased attendance by 55% over the past five years, and other theaters such as the Brattle Theatre (Cambridge, MA), and Pickford Film Center (Bellingham, WA) also report steady growth.

These organizations, including the Michigan Theater Foundation (Ann Arbor, MI), the parent organization of Art House Convergence and two historic theaters, are mature arts nonprofits. The Michigan Theater Foundation currently has a membership of over 7,000 individuals and since 2015 has raised $9 million dollars for a major renovation of its historic State Theatre. Likewise, Film Streams (Omaha, NE) recently completed a $9 million capital campaign to restore and renovate the historic Dundee Theater with outstanding results — in 2018 they enjoyed increased revenue, attendance, membership, and ensured that 30% of exhibited films were directed by women.

Art house theaters across the country are also expanding their programming to include robust media arts curricula. The Jacob Burns Film Center (Pleasantville, NY) has implemented education programs for over 150,000 students since 2001, while the Bryn Mawr Film Institute (Bryn Mawr, PA) educates 5,000 students each year, offering filmmaking and documentary courses as well as educational opportunities for elementary school students.

At the same time, in the face of our current social and political polarizations, independent theaters including the Nickelodeon Theatre (Columbia, SC), FilmScene (Iowa City, IA), and the Nightlight Cinema (Akron, OH) are giving audiences the opportunity to see films from countries including Palestine, Kenya, Lebanon, and Colombia. These screenings are indispensable invitations to encounter diverse perspectives while enlarging one’s understanding of the world, not just presentations of “obscure foreign language movies” as Variety describes. 

Art houses are successfully crafting community partnerships with other organizations, as the Doris Duke Theatre (Honolulu, HI) did with Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking on their “Women in Film” series, and collaborating with each other on programming initiatives like The Seventh Art Stand, championed by the Northwest Film Forum (Seattle, WA), and Science on Screen, which through a partnership between the Coolidge Corner Theatre (Brookline, MA) and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has helped 82 cinemas host science related programs.

These vibrant theaters demonstrate that audiences everywhere appreciate collective viewing and the public square. Art houses are going to keep bringing people together, showing incredible films, and facilitating challenging conversations —  that’s far more than just keeping the lights on.

Alison Kozberg
Managing Director
Art House Convergence
Los Angeles, CA

Makenzie Peecook
Conference Manager
Art House Convergence
Ann Arbor, MI

AHC Conference Hosts Filmmakers Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera

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AlexCristina

On the eve of the world premiere of their new film The Infiltrators in the NEXT section at the Sundance Film Festival, filmmakers Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera attended the 2019 Art House Convergence annual conference for a conversation about cinema, the U.S./Mexico border, and Latino-identity.

The Infiltrators, a formally inventive hybridization of narrative and documentary that combines footage of the real-life Dreamers who go undercover in detention facilities with dramatic reenactments of their efforts, received the NEXT Audience Award and NEXT Innovator Prize at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival.

This conversation took place in the final days of a prolonged partial-shutdown of the U.S. federal government (the longest in the country’s history) spurred by a political stalemate over the construction of a border wall.

Collectively, Ibarra and Rivera have been making films about the border and its cultural, economic, and technological reverberations for over twenty years. They were founding members of the artist-run Latino distribution collective SubCine, and have participated in community based cinema programming through the ITVS community cinema program and Science on Screen respectively.

Information about booking The Infiltrators is forthcoming. However, their earlier documentary and narrative films about the production of the border as a place and idea are currently available for booking.

Las Marthas (Cristina Ibarra, 2013, 69 min.) Book this film.

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Unlike any other, the annual debutante ball in Laredo, Texas is part of a lucrative month-long festival honoring George Washington’s birthday. LAS MARTHAS follows two young women as they prepare for this elaborate rite of passage: Laurita, a 13th-generation debutante descended from Laredo’s original Spanish land grantees who questions debutante society’s class system geared toward girls like herself; and Rosario, a high-achieving, Mexican-raised and U.S.-schooled outsider struggling to understand the elite society’s unspoken rules.

Tracing the event’s origins back to 1898, the film works to unravel why a town like Laredo – with a population that is 98% Mexican – feels such affinity for America’s Founding Father. Despite history and all odds, the celebration perseveres and flourishes thanks to the Mexican American girls who wear this gilded tradition in the form of elaborate colonial gowns. LAS MARTHAS is a beautifully drawn and sometimes humorous, coming of age portrait of these two young women as they navigate this complex tradition in a time of economic uncertainty and political tension over immigration and border relations between the US and Mexico.

The Last Conquistador (Cristina Ibarra & John J. Valdez, 2008, 60 min.) Book this film.

Renowned sculptor John Houser has a dream: to build the world’s tallest bronze equestrian statue for the city of El Paso, Texas. He envisions a stunning monument to Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate that will honor the contributions Hispanic people made to building the American West. But as the project nears completion, troubles arise.

Native Americans are outraged — they remember Oñate as the man who brought genocide to their land and sold their children into slavery. As El Paso divides along lines of race and class in The Last Conquistador, the artist must face the moral implications of his work. A co-production of Independent Television Service (ITVS). A co-presentation of Latino Public Broadcasting, Native American Public Telecommunications and KERA Dallas/Fort Worth.

Sleep Dealer (Alex Rivera, 2008, 90 min.) Book this Film

Sleep Dealer is approved for Sloan Foundation-funded Science on Screen programs

SleepDealer

Sleep Dealer is a Sundance award-winning sci-fi thriller packed with stunning visuals and strong social and political themes.

Memo Cruz (Luis Fernando Peña) is a young man in near-future Mexico. When his family is victim of a misguided drone attack he finds himself with no option but to head north, towards the U.S./Mexico border. But migrant workers cannot cross this new world border – it’s been sealed off. Instead, Memo ends up in a strange digital factory in Mexico where he connects his body to a robot in America.

Memo’s search for a better future leads him to love, loss, and a confrontation with a mysterious figure from his past.

The Los Angeles Times writes “Adventurous, ambitious and ingeniously futuristic, Sleep Dealer is a welcome surprise. It combines visually arresting science fiction done on a budget with a strong sense of social commentary in a way that few films attempt, let alone achieve.“

 

Department of Justice Reviews antitrust judgement, the Paramount Consent Decrees

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On August 2, 2018 the Department of Justice announced that it would review 1,300 legacy antitrust judgements including the Paramount Consent Decrees, a series of consent decrees that restricted certain behaviors by specific motion picture studios.

During this review the Department of Justice will determine if  the decrees should be terminated or modified The Department of Justice will review responses until October 4, 2018.

What are the Paramount Consent Decrees?

In 1938 the Department of Justice filed a lawsuit alleging that eight motion picture studios had conspired to control the motion picture industry. Following the trial the district court and Supreme Court found these studios guilty of a widespread conspiracy to illegally fix motion picture prices and monopolize film distribution and movie theatre markets. Following these rulings the defendants entered into the Paramount Consent Decrees, agreements with the Department of Justice that regulated specific behaviors related to motion picture distribution and exhibition.

Which studios are subject to the Paramount Consent Decrees?

The remaining studios that are subject to the Paramount Consent Decrees are MGM, Sony Pictures, 20th Century Fox, Universal Pictures, and Warner Bros. as well as their subsidiaries.

What behaviors do the Paramount Consent Decrees restrict?

  1.  Vertical Integration of motion picture distribution and exhibition: The decrees separated film distribution and exhibition and divested five studios of their theaters, requiring them to receive special court permission to acquire theaters in the future.
  2. Block Booking: The decrees regulated the practice of bundling multiple films into a single license — licensing one film or group of films on the condition that an exhibitor would also license another feature or group of features. Studios could no longer force exhibitors to book their entire slate, instead the decrees gave exhibitors the right to reject 20% of feature films not previously trade shown.
  3. Circuit Dealing: Studios were required to license each film individually, theater by theater without discrimination in favor of specific theaters.
  4. Resale Price Maintenance/ Price Fixing: The decrees prohibited studios from setting minimum prices for movie theater admission.  
  5. Overbroad Clearances: The decrees prohibited studios from granting clearances (exclusive film licenses) between theaters that are not in substantial competition.

What other antitrust laws regulate the motion picture industry?

Since 1890 the Sherman Antitrust Act has made certain types of anticompetitive and monopolistic behaviors illegal.  The Act outlawed concentrations of power that restrained trade or inhibited interstate commerce.

Take Action: Protect Quality Film Exhibition

It is an important time to voice your support for the regulation of the monopolization of  the motion picture industry.

As mission-driven, community-based cinemas we purposefully program and exhibit motion pictures in service of the towns, cities, and regions where we are based. Our sustained commitment to community-service — to recognizing the needs, questions, and concerns of specific people and places — improves the quality of film exhibition, contributes to the economic wellbeing of the cities and towns where we are located, and increases consumer choice.

The regulation of anticompetitive behaviors in the motion picture industry is absolutely essential to preventing market consolidation, ensuring fair pricing, and protecting quality film exhibition. Allowing a small, powerful group of motion picture producers and distributors to own theaters risks making independent theaters dependent upon their competitors for content. While allowing large studios to set prices, control clearances, and bundle films into a single license hampers the ability of small business to innovate, collaborate with other small business (particularly small distributors), develop eclectic screening series, and initiate programs intended to invigorate their local economies — in short, it could give consolidated, large corporations excessive influence over programming, strategy, and pricing — allowing them to withhold content and obstruct efforts to work with multiple distributors/ suppliers.

While enforcement of many of the provisions of the Paramount Consent Decrees has eroded over time, with a variety of studios receiving special permission to enter into the film exhibition business in the 1980s, and disputes over licensing and clearances becoming the subject of multiple lawsuits over the course of the last decade, this does not mean that anti-monopolistic  regulation no longer serves a purpose in the motion picture industry. Instead, it is a moment to consider how enhanced regulations could ensure that small, independent exhibitors are able to continue innovating, working with multiple distributors, and providing consumers across America with access to quality film exhibition.

What You Can Do:

Tell the Department of Justice why antitrust legislation is important.

Remember the Department of Justice’s inquiry is focused on how the Paramount Decrees protect market competition and efficiency. Since much antitrust regulation focuses on protecting competition, focus your response on the ways that regulation can enhance and protect consumer choice, fair pricing, competition, and commerce.

Check out our glossary below.

The DOJ is accepting comments on the following questions until October 4, 2018.

  • Do the Paramount Decrees continue to serve important competitive purposes today? Why or why not?
  • Individually, or collectively, are the decree provisions relating to (1) movie distributors owning movie theatres; (2) block booking; (3) circuit dealing; (4) resale price maintenance; and (5) overbroad clearances necessary to protect competition? Are any of these provisions ineffective in protecting competition or inefficient? Do any of these provisions inhibit competition or cause anticompetitive effects?
  • What, if any, modifications to the Paramount Decrees would enhance competition and efficiency? What legal justifications would support such modifications, if any?
  • What effect, if any, would the termination of the Paramount Decrees have on the distribution and exhibition of motion pictures?
  • Have changes to the motion picture industry since the 1940s, including but not limited to, digital production and distribution, multiplex theatres, new distribution and movie viewing platforms render any of the Consent Decree provisions unnecessary?
  • Are existing antitrust laws, including, the precedent of United States v. Paramount, and its progeny, sufficient or insufficient to protect competition in the motion picture industry?

Organizations can submit their commits via email to atr.mep.information@usdoj.gov

Read more about the review here.

Glossary

  • Competitive/ Market Competition Conditions in which different companies or economic entities sell or provide similar products or services and rival for consumers. According to the Federal Trade Commission “Aggressive competition among sellers in an open marketplace gives consumers — both individuals and businesses — the benefits of lower prices, higher quality products and services, more choices, and greater innovation.”
  • Monopoly When a company becomes the only provider of a good or service with no reasonable or tenable substitute.
  • Monopsony When a single entity becomes the only buyer for a good or service (imagine if all food suppliers sold to a single food retailer).
  • Price Fixing an agreement among competitors that raises, lowers, or stabilizes prices or competitive terms  (since the 1980s, regulation has primarily been concerned with raising consumer prices, less attention has been paid to when competitors lower prices)
  • Trust A group of businesses or companies tied together through contracts and cross-ownership.
  • Vertical Integration When a company controls multiple stages of the supply chain.  

Questions? Contact us.

 

A Letter to The Los Angeles Times

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As a coalition of mission-driven film exhibitors committed to using cinema to foster shared experiences and inspire collective action, we share the outrage voiced by Haifaa al-Mansour, Susanne Bier, Sara Colangelo, Nicole Holofcener, and Tamara Jenkins’ in The Los Angeles Times‘ August 30 piece “Five Female Directors, many stories: A conversation on filmmaking, Netflix and more” about the lack of funding and support for projects helmed by female-identifying and gender nonconforming filmmakers. To remain relevant and compelling the motion picture industry must dismantle its established power structures and support the careers and visions of filmmakers who have remained unrepresented and unheard for far too long. Change is imperative and long overdue.

However, in light of the roundtable’s diminishment of the importance of movie theaters, we must assert the vital part we have to play in advancing equity in the motion picture industry. Art House cinemas connect films to the public in ways that are substantive and offer tangible benefits. We teach media literacy, art appreciation, critical viewing practices, and we help audiences speak with each other — using films as the basis for conversations about race, gender, and policy. In a fragmented media landscape we remain committed to facilitating meaningful exchanges between people of diverse backgrounds and perspectives.

Recently Art House cinemas have celebrated the trailblazing women who shaped the film industry, as the Brattle Theatre in Cambridge, MA did with “Year of Women in Cinema,” women’s contributions to the labor movement, as the BAMcinématek in Brooklyn did with “Women at Work: Labor Activism,” devoted festivals to showcasing work by female and queer filmmakers, as Cinema Detroit does with “Shetown” and “Trans Stellar,” and reserved entire months for films directed by women, as FilmScene in Iowa City did with “Women’s March.” We have screened films by Agnès Varda,  Aurora Guerrero, Chloé Zhao, Ava DuVernay, Lucrecia Martel, and foregrounded the work of women activists, educators, and lawmakers in events to accompany documentaries like Whose Streets? and RBG.

Art House cinemas support women as leaders — we employ women executives, programmers, educators, and managers — yet there is still a long way to go.

Publicly accessible cinemas and shared experiences are essential tools in the fight for equity.  We invite inspiring filmmakers like Haifaa al-Mansour, Susanne Bier, Sara Colangelo, Nicole Holofcener, and Tamara Jenkins, and powerful corporations like Netflix, to work with us.

We want to screen your films. We want to include them in conversations, roundtables,  retrospectives, and series. We want to invite you to our theaters, and to continue to support and program the local and emerging filmmakers inspired by your achievements.

Sincerely,

Alison Kozberg
Managing Director
Art House Convergence